4 Crucial Care Tips for Bonded Teeth

Modern composite resins are truly a cut above the tooth-colored dental restoration materials available years ago, capable of flexing with your natural teeth and remaining intact for decades. Unfortunately, bonded teeth aren't immune to damage, which is why you should remember these three crucial care tips for composite resin repairs. 


Watch the Whitening

Your dental enamel contains thousands of microscopic pores that can absorb pigment, which is why most people experience some accumulative discoloration over time. Unfortunately, because the composite resins used by your dentist have a different molecular structure, they will not lighten like your natural teeth.

In fact, whitening your teeth when you have composite resin restorations may create a mottled appearance because your teeth may become lighter than the restorations. To avoid problems, always talk with your doctor before you start any kind of whitening routine, and only use toothpastes recommended by your dentist.

If you need dental bonding and teeth whitening, have your teeth whitened prior to having the composite resins added. That way, your dentist can opt for a composite the same color as your whitened teeth, and the repairs will blend in seamlessly.

Dentists can also recommend the proper whitening agent for your level of staining, helping you to avoid side effects like dental sensitivity and opaque tooth edges.   


Be Gentle With Teeth

As you go about your day, you might encounter several different items that need to be opened, including bottles and packages. Unfortunately, if you use your teeth to twist open those bottles or rip into those bags, you could fracture your dental bonding.

People can also run into trouble with damaged dental bonding when they chew hard foods or rip off plastic retail tags with their teeth. Playing sports or living with a teeth grinding problem can also ruin composite resin restorations.

To protect your bonded teeth, be gentle with your smile. Only use a soft-bristled toothbrush, and focus on never biting into packages with your teeth. Avoid habits that could damage your smile, such as biting your nails or chewing on pens. If you suspect that you clench or grind your teeth when you sleep, talk with your dentist about protective mouth guards.

Although prevention is always easier than repairs, dental bonding is easy to restore if damage does happen. After carefully evaluating the damage and making sure the issue hasn't caused deeper problems, your dentist can match composite resins with the natural shade of your teeth, add the proper amount of resin, and then shape and polish it until your teeth look perfect again.


Avoid Alcohol

After dental bonding is put in place, your dentist will cure it with a blue ultra-violet light to cure the compound. While it is true that this process creates incredibly hard and solid dental restorations, the molecular structure of composite resins can be disturbed by alcohol, which is why dentists recommend avoiding mouthwashes or drinks that contain alcohol.

If dental bonding is softened by continued exposure to alcohol, the bonding material may be more likely to sustain microscopic scratches or dents, which could damage the structural integrity of the repair. Additionally, alcohol can contribute to mouth dryness, leading to dental decay and bad breath.

When you purchase mouthwash, make sure it doesn't contain alcohol. If you enjoy alcoholic beverages from time to time, use a straw and swish your mouth with water afterward to prevent contact between the beverage and your dental repair.

If your smile could use a few updates, stop by the office of Kenneth M. Schweizer, DDS, PA. In addition to helping families with a full range of preventive and restorative dentistry services, our experienced team of family dentists can also help with CEREC® same-day crowns and dental implants.